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Immune Activation in Treated HIV Infection: A New Paradigm
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Presenters: Peter W. Hunt, MD
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Description

Peter Hunt, MD gives an overview of immune activation in HIV infection, including the ways the inflammation associated with HIV is different from that associated with normal aging, the role of inductive lymphoid tissues and the gut in storing the virus, and ways to manage immune activation in the modern treatment era.

Presenters: Peter W. Hunt, MD

Peter Hunt is an Associate Professor of Medicine in the HIV/AIDS division at the University of California San Francisco, Chair of the ACTG Inflammation and End Organ Disease Transformative Science Group, and a member of the Executive Committee of the AIDS Research Institute at UCSF. His primary research focus is on the inflammatory consequences of HIV infection. His clinic-based translational research program seeks to understand the determinants of persistent immune activation both in the presence and the absence of antiretroviral therapy, and to assess the impact of immune activation on clinical outcomes. He collaborates extensively with a multi-disciplinary team of investigators to assess the impact of persistent immune activation despite viral suppression on mortality and chronic diseases associated with aging (i.e., cardiovascular disease) and conducts pilot clinical trials of novel immune-based interventions designed to decrease immune activation. Dr. Hunt also leads a translational research program in Mbarara, Uganda, focused on the determinants of immune recovery during suppressive antiretroviral therapy in that setting. Dr. Hunt has also helped develop a large mucosal immunology program at San Francisco General Hospital focused on the impact of HIV on gut-associated lymphoid tissue and the determinants of microbial translocation in HIV infection.